Quantitative control of Ets1 dosage by a multi-enhancer hub promotes Th1 cell differentiation and protects from allergic inflammation

Quantitative control of Ets1 dosage by a multi-enhancer hub promotes Th1 cell differentiation and protects from allergic inflammation

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Chandra, A., Yoon, S., Michieletto, M. F., Goldman, N., Ferrari, E. K., Abedi, M., Johnson, I., Fasolino, M., Pham, K., Joannas, L., Kee, B. L., Henao-Mejia, J., & Vahedi, G. (2023). Quantitative control of Ets1 dosage by a multi-enhancer hub promotes Th1 cell differentiation and protects from allergic inflammation. Immunity, 56(7), 1451-1467.e12.

Abstract

Multi-enhancer hubs are spatial clusters of enhancers present across numerous developmental programs. Here, we studied the functional relevance of these three-dimensional structures in T cell biology. Mathematical modeling identified a highly connected multi-enhancer hub at the Ets1 locus, comprising a noncoding regulatory element that was a hotspot for sequence variation associated with allergic disease in humans. Deletion of this regulatory element in mice revealed that the multi-enhancer connectivity was dispensable for T cell development but required for CD4+ T helper 1 (Th1) differentiation. These mice were protected from Th1-mediated colitis but exhibited overt allergic responses. Mechanistically, the multi-enhancer hub controlled the dosage of Ets1 that was required for CTCF recruitment and assembly of Th1-specific genome topology. Our findings establish a paradigm wherein multi-enhancer hubs control cellular competence to respond to an inductive cue through quantitative control of gene dosage and provide insight into how sequence variation within noncoding elements at the Ets1 locus predisposes individuals to allergic responses.

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